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Waders Savannah GA

Local resource for waders in Savannah. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to fishing gear and supplies, bait and tackle shops, fishing guides, fly fishing lessons and fishing trips, as well as advice and content on fishing equipment and resources.

Dejelo International Inc
(912) 238-9779
18 Heathcote Circle
Savannah, GA
 
Biltmore
(912) 236-4065
4707 Ogeechee Road
Savannah, GA
 
Southern Events
(912) 238-5565
639 East Park Avenue
Savannah, GA
 
Eastern Travel Center
(912) 236-7229
4519 Ogeechee Road
Savannah, GA
 
Big Tom`s Pawn Shop
(912) 352-0008
5511 Montgomery Street
Savannah, GA
 
Dean Forest Mobile Home Park Inc
(912) 236-9103
1304 Dean Forest Road
Savannah, GA
 
Welsh Pawn Shops
(912) 352-4474
5521 Abercorn Street
Savannah, GA
 
Cruise America Motorhome Rental & Sales
(912) 236-0637
219 West Bryan Street
Savannah, GA
 
Welsh Pawn Shops
(912) 233-1356
402 West Broughton Street
Savannah, GA
 
Bicycle Link
(912) 233-9401
22 West Broughton Street
Savannah, GA
 

Styles of Waders

As with many of the decisions you'll be making, this first decision will depend on the type of water that you'll be primarily fishing...shallow, moderate or deep.

Hip Waders
These fishing waders extend up to the upper leg and groin area of the angler. Hip waders are popular for fishing shallow waters because they are more comfortable than other fishing waders and because they are quite simple to get in and out of.

Waist Waders
These fishing waders extend up to the waist of the angler and include a belt that you buckle around your waist, similar to a pair of pants. Waist waders are popular for fishing moderately deeper waters because while they are not quite as comfortable as the hip waders, they are still more comfortable and easier to maneuver in than the chest waders which we'll talk about next.

Chest Waders
As the name suggests, these fishing waders extend up to the chest of the angler and include straps that you secure over your shoulder to hold them up. Chest waders are popular for fishing deeper, slow moving waters because they allow the angler to closer to the fish in the deepest holes. The down side to these waders is that they are more difficult to get in and out of in the event of the eventual bathroom break.

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Types of Waders

There are two different types of fly fishing waders available today. They are the "Bootfoot" and the "Stockingfoot" wader which we will discuss next.

Bootfoot waders
Bootfoot waders are the all-in-one fishing waders like the ones we remember growing up with as kids. The benefit to these waders is that they are typically less expensive. They only true disadvantage to these waders is that they cannot be turned inside out to dry them out which is very important to keep that mildew smell away. Other cons that are sometimes mentioned are that they are heavier than stockingfoot waders but once the boot is factored into the equation, the weight is very similar.

Stockingfoot waders
Stockingfoot waders do not have a hard-soled boot attached all in one unit but includes a waterproof, neoprene sock instead. Wading boots are purchased independently and fitted over the neoprene sock. The disadvantage to these waders is that they typically cost more since you purchase the wader and the boot separately. The advantage is that they give you more flexibility to mix and match different types and styles of boot and waders based on the conditions you'll be fishing in. These types of waders are definitely growing in popularity because of the flexibility they give the angler.

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Wader Materials

This one is open for discussion but unless you're going for your doctorate in wader technology (which could be a reality some day with all the new technology they're introducing into these waders), we're only going to discuss two types, "Neoprene" and "Breathable" waders.

Neoprene
These waders are made of a thick, insulated rubber-like material called neoprene. Neoprene waders are primarily used today when fishing in colder water conditions because of their insulating value. Generally, neoprene fishing waders run from a 3mm thickness (for general warmer weather fly fishing) to a 5mm thickness (ideal for cold water). Generally speaking, if you plan on doing some winter fishing or will be fishing the icy waters of Alaska or a similar climate, then neoprene waders may be the way you want to go. The problem with neoprene waders is that they are not breathable making them an uncomfortable choice when fishing the warm summer months.

Breathable
Breathable waders have taken the market by storm over the past few years. They are designed to allow your body's perspiration to escape will still keeping the water out. You'll definitely want to hook up with this type of wader to maximize your comfort if you plan to spend a full day or multiple days on the water. Some of today's breathable waders are made from such materials as Simms QuadraLam™, Hodgman's Horco-Tex® and the ever popular Gore-Tex®. With names like these, your pocketbook is really the only thing that will determine which brand or type of breathable wader you decide to go with.

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