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Trout Flies Rio Rancho NM

Local resource for trout flies in Rio Rancho. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to trout fishing supplies, bait and tackle shops, trout fishing guides, fly fishing stores and fly fishing lessons, as well as advice and content on trout fishing products and resources.

Corrales Sport Inc
(505) 899-6336
113 Doolittle Road
Corrales, NM
 
Sports Authority
(505) 344-9001
4720 Alexander Boulevard Northeast
Albuquerque, NM
Services
Golf Hitting Cage, Golf Trade-In Program, Ski-Snowboard Rentals, Ski-Snowboard/Bike Tech Shop, Firearms/Hunting, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:00pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Sports Authority
(505) 344-9001
4720 Alexander Boulevard Northeast
Albuquerque, NM
Services
Golf Hitting Cage, Golf Trade-In Program, Ski-Snowboard Rentals, Ski-Snowboard/Bike Tech Shop, Firearms/Hunting, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:00pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Cotton Wood Cycles
(505) 326-0429
4370 East Main Street
Farmington, NM
 
Courtesy Sporting & Pawn
(505)887-1811 , (505)887-0839
903 West Lea Street
Carlsbad, NM
 
Albuquerque REI Store
(505) 247-1191
1550 Mercantile Ave NE
Albuquerque, NM
 
Sports Authority
(505) 881-8082
Winrock Mall, 2100 Louisiana Boulevard Northeast
Albuquerque, NM
Services
Golf Hitting Cage, Golf Trade-In Program, Ski-Snowboard/Bike Tech Shop, Firearms/Hunting, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 10:00am - 9:00pm
Sunday: 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Custom Cartridge Company
(505) 523-7900
3225 South Main Street
Las Cruces, NM
 
Albuquerque REI Store
(505) 247-1191
1550 Mercantile Ave NE
Albuquerque, NM
 
Santa Fe REI Store
(505) 982-3557
500 Market Street Suite 100
Santa Fe, NM
 

Caddis Flies

The next species of flies are the caddis flies. These are also sometimes referred to as sedge flies. Caddis flies look a little like moths when they become adults.


Larvae and Pupae
Hatching from an egg, a caddis becomes a worm-like larva. These larvae will find anything they can to surround themselves with for protection. Some surround themselves with sticks or bits of vegetation or even sand bound together with silk that they excrete from their mouths. You would fish this stage about the same as a nymph in that you dead drift the fly down at the depth at which the trout are feeding.

The pupa stage begins anywhere from six months to a year after it is born. During this stage an adult body forms inside the pupa. When it is ready, the adult then emerges out of its covering with quite a show, beginning the final stage of adulthood.

Adults
The emerging adult produces a gas bubble that floats it to the surface. As it ascends to the surface, the shell expands and bursts, and the adult pops out of the water. Some ascend with such speed that fish leap out of the water after them while others have to rest for a moment before taking flight. They'll test their wings which will attract any nearby trout to strike.

You'll want to simulate your caddis flies to appear as though they are rising to the surface, about to take flight. Cast your fly upstream, allow it to dead drift to the fish, and just before it arrives, lift your rod and fly line to raise the fly.



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Fly Fishing with Ants: The summertime trout smorgasbord

So why do trout relish ants so much? Many forms of this question have been posed to me quite often of late. Perhaps they get tuned into ants because they are so prevalent during the summer months. Perhaps they like the acidic flavor of ants? How do I know that ants are acidic? Well, let me tell you that I have no personal experience with that one but have read reports where others have actually resorted to taste testing of ants. Why? Because they love their sport.

Every serious fly fisherman will carry various ant patterns in their fly box at all times and will use them often. There are even times when trout will snub a substantial may fly hatch for these juicy, acidic ants.

Ant patterns can be used effectively from April through October and sometimes even into November in some areas but the best time to use ants is typically from May through September when they are the most active in searching for food and/or mating. You can use ants any time during the day but the best time is mid-morning or after, when the ground has warmed and the ants kick it into high gear.

If you are fishing slow moving, clear water, you may want to use smaller ant patterns especially if your foe seems to be very selective. If you see trout rising to your ant pattern and then turning away, that is an indication that they are interested but a little unsure. Try using a smaller size…one size at a time until you find the right size. Of course “the right size” will be defined by the size you’re using when you get your first take.

When fishing these smaller sizes, don’t be afraid to tie in a post as a visual aid. Posts should be kept fairly small so that the trout cannot see it from underneath. Posts are usually made from calf tail, antron or other similar, high floating material in white.

On the other hand, if you are fishing swift, choppy water, when the trout need to make a split second decision or miss a meal, you may need to use a large p...

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